ACCES

Home / ACCES / People

Board of Directors

Executive DirectorRebecca S. Bigler, Ph.D.
Director of CommunicationsLise Eliot, Ph.D.
Director of OperationsRichard A. Fabes, Ph.D.
Director of MembershipDiane F. Halpern, Ph.D.
Directors of School RelationsLaura D. Hanish, Ph.D.
Carol Lynn Martin, Ph.D.
Directors of ResearchJanet Shibley Hyde, Ph.D.
Lynn S. Liben, Ph.D.
Board MembersOscar Barbarin, Ph.D.
Philip Rodkin, Ph.D.

 

 

Oscar Barbarin is the Hertz Endowed Chair in the Department of Psychology at Tulane University in New Orleans. He received his B.A. in philosophy from St. Joseph’s Seminary College, and an M.S. in psychology and Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Rutgers University. He was a post-doctoral fellow in Social Psychology at Stanford University. Before joining the Tulane faculty he was a professor at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor where he directed the South African Initiative Office and the University Center for the Child and Family. As a Fellow of the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, Dr. Barbarin directed a national project addressing the socio-emotional and academic development of boys of color. His research has focused on children's mental health, early childhood education, effects of parental and teacher practices on children cognitive and emotional development, and family- and school-based interventions to reduce achievement gaps.  Dr. Barbarin collaborated on a longitudinal study of child development in South Africa, including publishing a book in 2001, Mandela’s Children: Child development in post-Apartheid South Africa. He was elected  to the Governing Council of the Society for Research in Child Development.  He chairs the U.S. National committee for Psychology (National Academies of Science) and serves on the executive committee of  International Union of Psychological Sciences.  He is editor of the American Journal of Orthopsychiatry. His most recent publications include the Handbook of Child Development and Early Education, an edited volume of translating developmental research into educational practice. His current research focuses on  the relation between early math skills and self-regulation and family interventions to promote early math skills at home.

Rebecca S. Bigler (Executive Director) is Professor of Psychology and Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. She studies the causes and consequences of social stereotyping and prejudice, with a particular focus on gender and racial attitudes. She has worked to develop and test intervention strategies aimed at reducing children’s gender stereotyping and biases. Her work has appeared in top journals in the field of developmental psychology (Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, Developmental Psychology), and has been covered by major media outlets (Newsweek, NBC Dateline). Her recent work examines the effect of single-sex schooling on girls’ academic performance and gender role development.

Lise Eliot (Director of Communications) is Associate Professor of Neuroscience at the Chicago Medical School of Rosalind Franklin University, where she directs the Interdepartmental Ph.D. Program in Neuroscience. A graduate of Harvard, she received her Ph.D. with Eric Kandel at Columbia University and did postdoctoral research in cellular neurophysiology at Baylor College of Medicine before turning her attention to human brain development and plasticity. Her first book, What’s Going On In There? How the Brain and Mind Develop in the First Five Years of Life, has been hailed as “popular science at its best” and is published in six languages. Her new book, Pink Brain, Blue Brain: How Small Differences Grow Into Troublesome Gaps – And What We Can Do About It, was named one of the Best Books of 2009 by the Washington Post and “masterful” by Newsweek. She is also author of over 60 articles and lectures widely to parents, teachers, and health professionals about brain development and learning.

Richard A. Fabes (Director of Operations) is the Dee and John Whiteman Professor of Child Development in the T. Denny Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamics (http://thesanfordschool.asu.edu/) at Arizona State University.  He is also the Founding Director of the School and one of the Executive Directors of the Lives of Girls and Boys Enterprise (https://thesanfordschool.asu.edu/lives), which is a an interdisciplinary set of initiatives that are designed to promote innovative research and its application to the real life issues and challenges facing girls and boys as they develop.  He has published numerous articles including state-of-the-science reviews of prosocial development for the Handbook of Child Psychology and has published over 150 refereed articles, chapters, and books. He has written textbooks on child development, including Exploring Child Development (3rd Edition) and Discovering Child Development (2nd Edition). His most recent projects involve a longitudinal study of gender-related attitudes and beliefs across elementary school, several large-scale studies of teachers’ roles in gender socialization, and exploring the dynamics of gender development, as well as a large project on the importance of kindergarten in children’s social and academic development.

Diane F. Halpern (Director of Membership) is the Trustee Professor of Psychology at Claremont McKenna College and a past-president of the American Psychological Association. She has published hundreds of articles and many books, including Thought and Knowledge: An Introduction to Critical Thinking (5th edition coming soon!), Sex Differences in Cognitive Abilities (4th edition), and Women at the Top: Powerful Leaders Tell Us How to Combine Work and Family (co-authored with Fanny Cheung). Her other recent books include Psychological Science (3rd edition) with Michael Gazzaniga and Todd Heatherton and the edited book, Undergraduate Education in Psychology: A Blueprint for the Future of the Discipline. Her most recent projects are the development of a computerized game that teaches critical thinking and scientific reasoning with Keith Millis at Northern Illinois University and Art Graesser at University of Memphis and a new critical thinking assessment that uses multiple response formats, which allow test takers to demonstrate their ability to think about everyday topics using both constructed response and recognition formats.

Laura D. Hanish (Director of School Relations) is an Associate Professor of Child Development in the T. Denny Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamics at Arizona State University. She is also the Director of Graduate Studies for the Program in Family and Human Development and one of the Enterprise Leaders of the Lives of Girls and Boys Enterprise (https://thesanfordschool.asu.edu/lives), which is an interdisciplinary set of initiatives that are designed to promote innovative research and its application to the real life issues and challenges facing girls and boys as they develop.  She has served as a chartered member of an NIH study section and on the editorial boards of Child Development and Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. Her publications focus on girls’ and boys’ peer relationships, problem behaviors, and school success during the preschool and elementary school years. Her most recent projects include the generation of new knowledge about the nature and impact of girls’ and boys’ interactions during science tasks, several large-scale studies of teachers’ roles in gender socialization, and the application of methods to study peer relationship qualities.

Janet Shibley Hyde (Director of Research) is the Helen Thompson Woolley Professor of Psychology, and of Gender and Women’s Studies, at the University of Wisconsin—Madison. She earned her undergraduate degree in Mathematics at Oberlin College and her Ph.D. in Psychology at the University of California, Berkeley. Specializing in the psychology of women and gender development, she has conducted a program of research using the statistical technique of meta-analysis to assess the magnitude of gender differences in psychological variables such as mathematics performance and self-esteem. The results of these meta-analyses led her to propose the Gender Similarities Hypothesis, which argues that males and females are very similar on most, but not all, psychological variables.

Lynn S. Liben (Director of Research) is Distinguished Professor Psychology at the Pennsylvania State University where she also holds faculty appointments in the College of Health and Human Development and the College of Education. She is President-Elect of the Society for Research in Child Development and Past President of the Developmental Division of the American Psychological Association and of the Jean Piaget Society. She has authored numerous articles, edited major journals (Child Development; Journal of Experimental Child Psychology), and edited or authored various books, including Gender Development (written with Elaine Blakemore and Sheri Berenbaum). Much of her research addresses the conditions that serve to exaggerate or to reduce children’s gender stereotypes. Additionally, she studies the consequences of those stereotypes on children’s educational, leisure, and occupational choices and achievements. Current projects include a study of the causes of the persistent gender imbalance seen in winners of the National  Geographic Bee (in collaboration with geographer Roger Downs; funded by the National Geographic Society) and an investigation of whether a curriculum to teach spatial skills to middle-school students will impact math and science achievement and enhance interest in Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics (STEM) careers (in collaboration with engineer Sheryl Sorby; funded by the National Science Foundation).

Carol Lynn Martin (Director of School Relations) is Cowden Distinguished Professor of Child Development in the T. Denny Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamics at Arizona State University. She is also one of the Executive Directors of the Lives of Girls and Boys Enterprise (https://thesanfordschool.asu.edu/lives), which is a an interdisciplinary set of initiatives that are designed to promote innovative research and its application to the real life issues and challenges facing girls and boys as they develop. She was an Associate Editor of Developmental Psychology and has served on several editorial boards for leading child development journals, and she has published numerous articles, including state-of-the-science reviews of gender development for the Handbook of Child Psychology and for the Annual Review of Psychology. She has written textbooks on child development, including Exploring Child Development (3rd Edition) and Discovering Child Development (2nd Edition). Her most recent projects involve a longitudinal study of gender-related attitudes and beliefs across elementary school, several large-scale studies of teachers’ roles in gender socialization, and exploring the dynamics of gender development.

Philip C. Rodkin is an associate professor of child development in the Departments of Educational Psychology and Psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He received his B.A. in Behavioral Sciences from the University of Chicago in 1988 and his Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Harvard University in 1994. Prof. Rodkin's research concerns children's social relationships in elementary school classrooms and the importance of these relationships for adjustment outcomes such as aggression and academic achievement. His research explores phenomena such as the connection between being aggressive and being cool; how Euro- and African-American children get along with one another in diverse elementary classrooms; and the status dynamics of bullying and victimization between boys and girls in elementary school. Prof. Rodkin is currently funded by the Institute of Education Sciences (U.S. Department of Education) to examine factors that successful teachers naturally use to help create and maintain a healthy classroom peer ecology over the school year. One goal of this work is to understand the socialization and development of aggression, and to devise interventions that use children's existing social relationships to reduce problem behavior and promote academic engagement in school.